10MM Turquoise BEADS CATHOLIC AVE MARIA 5 DECADE ROSARY NECKLACE CROS

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10MM Turquoise BEADS CATHOLIC AVE MARIA 5 DECADE ROSARY NECKLACE CROS

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Gold Turquoise BEADS CATHOLIC AVE MARIA 5 DECADE ROSARY NECKLACE CROSS ITALY


Valuable . Precious . Rare
Gold Turquoise BEADS CATHOLIC AVE MARIA 5 DECADE ROSARY NECKLACE CROSS ITALY

5.5 CM CROSS FROM ITALY
AVE MARIA MEDAL FROM ITALY
SIX FATHER Turquoise BEADS SIZE: 12MM FROM TIBET CHINA
BEAD SIZE: 10MM
WEIGHT: 150 G
QUALITY: HIGH QUALITY

You are Biding on a nice Valuable Gold Turquoise BEADS CATHOLIC AVE MARIA 5 DECADE ROSARY NECKLACE CROSS ITALY, It has Shaped Super Turquoise BEADS Rosary,With Each Speclal Designation Bead Being Round.Well Kept with no cracks at all.Its appearance and quality are excellent.
Offering for your spiritual life, witness wear, or gift giving, a stunning religious rosary from olden oridental. This Rosaryis so one size Fits most teens/adults,Very stylish and unique, great religious's witness wear, great prayer reminder, and thanks for looking.

I'm sorry due to the limit of my camera, I cannot present the complete beauty of this bead to you. If you have the chance to get this Rosary, please don't forget to admire it under light.This Rosary will become part of your life!

If you have any questions or you need more information about this or any other product, please email me.Please take a moment to browse through the other lovely jewelry items in my store, and add me to your list of favorites.




* Turquoise is an opaque, blue-to-green mineral that is a hydrous phosphate of copper and aluminium, with the chemical formula CuAl6(PO4)4(OH)8·4H2O. It is rare and valuable in finer grades and has been prized as a gem and ornamental stone for thousands of years owing to its unique hue.
The substance has been known by many names, but the word turquoise was derived around 16th century from the French language either from the word for Turkish (Turquois) or dark-blue stone (pierre turquin).This may have arisen from a misconception: turquoise does not occur in Turkey but was traded at Turkish bazaars to Venetian merchants who brought it to Europe.The colour, however, has been employed extensively in the decorative tiles adorning Turkish places of worship and homes for hundreds of years, beginning with the Seljuks, and the association quite possibly has caused the name to take root.

Properties of turquoise
Even the finest of turquoise is fracturable, reaching a maximum hardness of just under 6, or slightly more than window glass. Characteristically a cryptocrystalline mineral, turquoise almost never forms single crystals and all of its properties are highly variable. Its crystal system is proven to be triclinic via X-ray diffraction testing. With lower hardness comes lower specific gravity (high 2.90, low 2.60) and greater porosity: These properties are dependent on grain size. The lustre of turquoise is typically waxy to subvitreous, and transparency is usually opaque, but may be semitranslucent in thin sections. Colour is as variable as the mineral's other properties, ranging from white to a powder blue to a sky blue, and from a blue-green to a yellowish green. The blue is attributed to idiochromatic copper while the green may be the result of either iron impurities (replacing aluminium) or dehydration.

The refractive index (as measured by sodium light, 589.3 nm) of turquoise is approximately 1.61 or 1.62; this is a mean value seen as a single reading on a gemmological refractometer, owing to the almost invariably polycrystalline nature of turquoise. A reading of 1.61-1.65 (birefringence 0.040, biaxial positive) has been taken from rare single crystals. An absorption spectrum may also be obtained with a hand-held spectroscope, revealing a line at 432 nanometres and a weak band at 460 nanometres (this is best seen with strong reflected light). Under longwave ultraviolet light, turquoise may occasionally fluoresce green, yellow or bright blue; it is inert under shortwave ultraviolet and X-rays.

Turquoise is insoluble in all but heated hydrochloric acid. Its streak is a pale bluish white and its fracture is conchoidal, leaving a waxy lustre. Despite its low hardness relative to other gems, turquoise takes a good polish. Turquoise may also be peppered with flecks of pyrite or interspersed with dark, spidery limonite veining.

sources
China has been a minor source of turquoise for 3,000 years or more. Gem-quality material, in the form of compact nodules, is found in the fractured, silicified limestone of Yunxian and Zhushan, Hubei province. Additionally, Marco Polo reported turquoise found in present-day Sichuan. Most Chinese material is exported, but a few carvings worked in a manner similar to jade exist. In Tibet, where green turquoise has long been appreciated, gem-quality deposits purportedly exist in the mountains of Derge and Nagari-Khorsum in the east and west of the region respectively.Other notable localities include: Afghanistan; Australia (Victoria and Queensland); northern Chile (Chuquicamata); Cornwall; Saxony; Silesia; and Turkestan.

History of use
The pastel shades of turquoise have endeared it to many great cultures of antiquity: it has adorned the rulers of Ancient Egypt, the Aztecs (and possibly other Pre-Columbian Mesoamericans), Persia, Mesopotamia, the Indus Valley, and to some extent in ancient China since at least the Shang Dynasty. Despite being one of the oldest gems, probably first introduced to Europe (through Turkey) with other Silk Road novelties, turquoise did not become important as an ornamental stone in the West until the 14th century, following a decline in the Roman Catholic Church's influence which allowed the use of turquoise in secular jewellery. It was apparently unknown in India until the Mughal period, and unknown in Japan until the 18th century. A common belief shared by many of these civilizations held that turquoise possessed certain prophylactic qualities; it was thought to change colour with the wearer's health and protect him or her from untoward forces.

The Aztecs inlaid turquoise, together with gold, quartz, malachite, jet, jade, coral, and shells, into provocative (and presumably ceremonial) mosaic objects such as masks (some with a human skull as their base), knives, and shields. Natural resins, bitumen and wax were used to bond the turquoise to the objects' base material; this was usually wood, but bone and shell were also used. Like the Aztecs, the Pueblo, Navajo and Apache tribes cherished turquoise for its amuletic use; the latter tribe believe the stone to afford the archer dead aim. Among these peoples turquoise was used in mosaic inlay, in sculptural works, and was fashioned into toroidal beads and freeform pendants. The Ancestral Puebloans (Anasazi) of the Chaco Canyon and surrounding region are believed to have prospered greatly from their production and trading of turquoise objects. The distinctive silver jewelry produced by the Navajo and other Southwestern Native American tribes today is a rather modern development, thought to date from circa 1880 as a result of European influences.



In Persia, turquoise was the de facto national stone for millennia, extensively used to decorate objects (from turbans to bridles), mosques, and other important buildings both inside and out, such as the Medresseh-I Shah Husein Mosque of Isfahan. The Persian style and use of turquoise was later brought to India following the establishment of the Mughal Empire there, its influence seen in high purity gold jewellery (together with ruby and diamond) and in such buildings as the Taj Mahal. Persian turquoise was often engraved with devotional words in Arabic script which was then inlaid with gold.

The iconic gold burial mask of Tutankhamun, inlaid with turquoise, lapis lazuli, carnelian and coloured glass.
Cabochons of imported turquoise, along with coral, was (and still is) used extensively in the silver and gold jewellery of Tibet and Mongolia, where a greener hue is said to be preferred. Most of the pieces made today, with turquoise usually roughly polished into irregular cabochons set simply in silver, are meant for inexpensive export to Western markets and are probably not accurate representations of the original style.

The Egyptian use of turquoise stretches back as far as the First Dynasty and possibly earlier; however, probably the most well-known pieces incorporating the gem are those recovered from Tutankhamun's tomb, most notably the Pharaoh's iconic burial mask which was liberally inlaid with the stone. It also adorned rings and great sweeping necklaces called pectorals. Set in gold, the gem was fashioned into beads, used as inlay, and often carved in a scarab motif, accompanied by carnelian, lapis lazuli, and in later pieces, coloured glass. Turquoise, associated with the goddess Hathor, was so liked by the Ancient Egyptians that it became (arguably) the first gemstone to be imitated, the fair semblance created by an artificial glazed ceramic product known as faience. (A similar blue ceramic has been recovered from Bronze Age burial sites in the British Isles.)

The French conducted archaeological excavations of Egypt from the mid-19th century through the early 20th. These excavations, including that of Tutankhamun's tomb, created great public interest in the western world, subsequently influencing jewellery, architecture, and art of the time. Turquoise, already favoured for its pastel shades since c. 1810, was a staple of Egyptian Revival pieces. In contemporary Western use, turquoise is most often encountered cut en cabochon in silver rings, bracelets, often in the Native American style, or as tumbled or roughly hewn beads in chunky necklaces. Lesser material may be carved into fetishes, such as those crafted by the Zuni. While strong sky blues remain superior in value, mottled green and yellowish material is popular with artisans. In Western culture, turquoise is also the traditional birthstone for those born in the month of December.
In Judeo-Christian scripture


Turquoise may have significance in Judeo-Christian scripture: In the Book of Exodus, the construction of a "breastplate of judgment" is described as part of the priestly vestments of Aaron (Exodus 28:15-30). Attached to the ephod, the breastplate (Hoshen) was adorned with twelve gemstones set in gold and arranged in four rows, each stone engraved with the name of one of the Twelve Tribes of Israel. Of the four stones in the third row, the first and second have been translated to be turquoise by various scholars and English bible versions (usually not having both as turquoise at the same time); many others disagree, however.

In regard to the first of these stones, the translation is based on the Septuagint rendering the identity of the stone as chrysolithos (the masoretic text calls it tarshish, which just refers to Tarshish, a place, and gives no clue to the gem in question); at the time it was written chrysolithos did not mean Chrysolite specifically, but only golden stone (chryso-lithos). Chrysolithos is considered by scholars to possibly mean Topaz, Chrysolite, yellow Jasper, yellow Serpentine, or Turquoise - the last of these on the basis that Turquoise contains golden flecks, and that targums identified the stone as being sea coloured. Scholars favour stones which are mostly yellow as being the more likely solution, and opaque stones (Jasper or Serpentine) as more likely than translucent ones, on the consideration of nearby stones in the Hoshen.

In regard to the second of these stones, the masoretic text calls it shoham, and the Septuagint calls it Beryllios (Beryl), though elsewhere it translates shoham as onychion (Onyx), or as smaragdos (green stone). Shoham is of uncertain meaning. Following the Septuagint, some people think the stone should be an onyx (and many more traditional English versions of the Bible take this translation), but scholars think that the stone is actually Malachite (because it is green like beryl and smaragdos, cloudy as beryl can be, and in bands like onyx).




Posting Despatch: I normally post within 1 working days of receiving payment and the delivery time is about 3-12 business days (I consider extra time just in case...), the beautiful item posted to you from Tibet or Shanghai.
1. Choose a Airmail postage option for your package: Estimated delivery time is 6 - 12 Days ( business Days) US$ 8.41.to United State.
2. Choose a EMS postage option for your package: Estimated delivery time is 3 - 6 Days ( business Days) US$ 20.99.to United State.
If you need something urgently, please contact me before.




Materials Used

black ebony,wood,pewter,tibet oxen and yak bone skull,white copper

Product Attributes

Color: Grey

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First Item: $7.99
Additional Items: $2.99

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Terms of payment----
I use and recommend payment through PayPal, the fast, easy and secure way to pay online.For cashiers check as payment, Payment should be received within 5 days from the date of your final purchase and cannot guarantee an item to be available if payment arrives after this time.

Shipping----
I am deliver to: USA CANADA MEXICO EUROPE.
Posting Despatch: I normally post within 1 working days of receiving payment and the delivery time is about 6-12 business days, the beautiful item posted to you from Los Angeles or Tibet or Shanghai.
1. Choose a Airmail postage option for your package: Estimated delivery time is 6 - 12 Days ( business Days) US$ 9.99.to United State.
2. Choose a EMS postage option for your package: Estimated delivery time is 3 - 6 Days ( business Days) US$ 20.99.to United State.
If you need something urgently, please contact me before.
Thoughts about combine shipping: If you wish to combine few items together in one shipping, please contact me before.Usually I give discounts for a few items shippings.
Unexpected problems & further information: If you have any Unexpected problems with the product, Please contact me before you hurry to use the negative feedback and I promiss to deal with the situation for your satisfaction.

Estimated delivery dates----
include seller's handling time, and will depend on shipping service selected and receipt of cleared payment .Delivery times may vary, especially during peak periods.

Return policy----
Refund will be given as: Money Back
Item must be returned within:7 days after the buyer receives it.
Return policy details:Cost of Freight to the buyer is not included in the refund. Buyer must return the goods in original condition to the seller before any refund funds will be released. Buyer must arrange and pay for the shipping cost to the seller.

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